Modern Languages

Course ID
A Level (French, German, Italian) and IGCSE (French, German, Italian)

Introduction to the Modern Languages department

Modern Languages at Wolverhampton Grammar School includes the study of French, German and Italian.

Languages is a very popular subject and we are proud of our reputation as a school that has a long tradition developing exceptional language skills with students who go on to confidently converse and compete with their continental counterparts.

That provision of German, French and Italian continues to grow alongside the availability of annual exchange trips (which many other independent and state schools can no longer support).

The friendly, welcoming atmosphere provided by teachers (several of whom are native speakers), dedicated language classrooms and Language Lab, coupled with our approach to teaching (students and teachers often converse in their chosen language both inside and outside the classroom) produce consistently high and exceptional public exam results.

The following staff are members of the Department:

  • Elizabeth Harris (Head of Modern Languages)
  • Patrizia Manzai (Assistant Head of Department)
  • Robert Mason
  • Petra Grigat-Bradley
  • Sarah Brentnall
  • Rachel Munson
  • Silvia Causo-Garbutt (Italian language assistant)
  • Claire Keita (French language assistant)

Languages have always been a popular subject choice at school. The department has a history of organising successful exchange trips- the French Exchange has been running for over 25 years and they remain a highlight for many students during their time with us. Trips include an annual Rhine Valley trip and German, French and Italian Homestay exchange visits. The department also engages with academic and language departments a little closer to home, having established a link with Aston University.

In addition to traditional international exchange partnerships with other schools, the department also arranges for French students to undertake active work experience in France. French businesses in our exchange town of Savenay invite our older students in for a week, providing a unique and exceptional introduction to using the language in informal, conversational and formal situations.

A range of extra-curricular clubs and societies available to students across the school ensures confidence in languages is nurtured throughout the school.

Staff introduce languages to children from Junior School age and that love of language, culture and a different way of life stays with students right through to the Sixth Form.

Several of our students go on to study one or more language at university degree level.

Introduction to the Course

This course will help students to develop knowledge and understanding of written and spoken forms of the French language. There is an emphasis on grammar structure and vocabulary, both of which are important to enable students to learn to communicate effectively. Students gain greater cultural understanding of France and communities where French is spoken. There is an opportunity to take part in the well-established Savenay homestay exchange in the Spring term (away leg) and Summer term (home leg). The course follows a linear structure.

What the student will learn

  • How to listen to and understand spoken French language in a range of contexts and a variety of styles.
  • How to read and respond to different types of written language.
  • How to communicate in writing.
  • How to understand and apply a range of vocabulary and structures.
  • How to develop effective language learning and communication skills.
  • How to communicate in speech for different purposes.

Content of paper:

  • Home and abroad.
  • Education and employment.
  • House, home and daily routine.
  • The modern world and the environment.
  • Social activities, fitness and health.

How the student will be assessed

Assessment

Paper 1

Listening

 

Time

40 minutes

 

About

  • 50 marks.
  • 25% of total marks.

Paper 2

Reading and Writing

 

1 hour and 30 minutes

 

  • 60 marks.
  • 50% of total marks.

Paper 3

Speaking

10 minutes

 

  • 40 marks.
  • 25% of total marks.

Introduction to the Course

This qualification enables students to develop an understanding of German, in a range of familiar and practical contexts, and for a variety of purposes. It provides breadth, stretch and challenge and enables students to show what they know, understand and can do within a clearly defined list of topic and sub-topic areas. It provides a single tier of entry which tests the whole ability range providing an excellent grounding for those who may want to study German at AS or A2 level and is a highly regarded qualification for those who don’t.

If you are considering why students should learn German – Germany is one of the UK’s leading trading partners and British companies need professionals with a good knowledge of German.

What the student will learn

  • How to listen to and understand spoken German language in a range of contexts and a variety of styles.
  • How to read and respond to different types of written language.
  • How to communicate in writing.
  • How to understand and apply a range of vocabulary and structures.
  • How to develop effective language learning and communication skills.
  • How to communicate in speech for different purposes.

Content of paper:

  • Home and abroad.
  • Education and employment.
  • House, home and daily routine.
  • The modern world and the environment.
  • Social activities, fitness and health.

How the student will be assessed

Assessment

Paper 1

Listening

 

Time

40 minutes

 

About

  • 50 marks.
  • 25% of total marks.

Paper 2

Reading and Writing

1 hour and 30 minutes

 

  • 60 marks.
  • 50% of total marks.

 

Paper 3

Speaking

 

10 minutes

 

  • 40 marks.
  • 25% of total marks.

Introduction to the Course

The ability to communicate effectively in a foreign language is valuable. It is highly regarded in further education and in the work market. Learning and applying grammar structures is an essential part of the course and it is not only useful to enable correct communication, but also to develop transferable skills (analysis, memorising, drawing of inferences) to complement other areas of the curriculum. In addition students will gain greater cultural understanding of Italy and the influence that Italian culture has on the wider world. The course follows a linear structure.

What the student will learn

  • How to listen to and understand spoken Italian language in a range of contexts and a variety of styles.
  • How to read and respond to different types of written language.
  • How to communicate in writing.
  • How to understand and apply a range of vocabulary and structures.
  • How to develop effective language learning and communication skills.
  • How to communicate in speech for different purposes.

Content of paper:

  • Everyday activities.
  • Personal and social life.
  • The world around us.
  • The world of work.
  • The international world.

How the student will be assessed

Assessment

Paper 1

Listening

 

Time

45 minutes

 

About

  • Question types: multiple choice, box ticking and matching exercises.
  • Minimal writing in Italian required.
  • 25% of total marks.

Paper 2

Reading

 

1 hour

 

  • Question types: multiple choice, box ticking, grid filling and matching exercises.
  • Short answers in Italian.
  • 25% of total marks.

Paper 3

Speaking

 

15 minutes

 

  • One single interview with 3 sections, role plays, topic presentation and conversation and finally general conversation.
  • 25% of total marks.

Paper 4

Writing

 

1 hour

Section 1

  • Single word answers.
  • One directed writing task of 80 – 90 words.

Section 2:

  • Choice of 3 tasks (email/letter, article, narrative) 130 – 140 words.

France is our nearest neighbour and geographically our nearest overseas foreign language, making it a popular and important subject. It is taught by the Modern Foreign Languages Department (MFL) at Wolverhampton Grammar School.

More than 220 million people speak French on all the five continents. French is a major language of international communication. It is the second most widely learned language after English and the sixth most widely spoken language in the world. French has always been a popular subject choice at Wolverhampton Grammar School and the department has a history of organising successful exchange trips.

A friendly, welcoming atmosphere provided by teachers (several of whom are native speakers) can always be found in the dedicated Modern Foreign Languages block in School.

A Level French will be attractive to those who have enjoyed the challenge of French at GCSE and have found the linguistic aspect of work relatively easy. Studying more than one modern foreign language can also be greatly beneficial.

Any modern language fits well with traditional arts subjects, but given the economic importance of this language there is a great advantage to speaking confidently if you are considering a more scientific or industry tailored portfolio of subjects or career.

Assessment

AS Unit 1:

  • Oral
  • 30% (60 marks)
  • 12-14 minutes

AS Unit 2:

  • Listening, Reading and Translation
  • 50% (100 marks)
  • 2 hours

AS Unit 3:

  • Critical Response in Writing
  • 20% (40 marks)
  • 1 hour 15 minutes

A Level Unit 1:

  • Speaking a) Presentation of Research and b) Discussion based on stimulus card
  • 30% of A Level
  • 21-23 minutes

A Level Unit 2:

  • Listening, Reading and Translation
  • 50% of A Level
  • 2 hours, 30 minutes

A Level Unit 3:

  • Critical and Analytical Response in Writing
  • 20% of A Level
  • 2 hours

Those who coped easily with GCSE could expect to find the work up to A level well within their capabilities.

German has always been a popular A Level subject choice at School. The department has a history of organising successful exchange trips including a German Exchange. Learning German can connect you to 120 million native speakers around the globe and it is the official language of
Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg and Liechtenstein as well as the native language for a significant population of northern Italy, eastern Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark, eastern France, parts of Poland, the Czech Republic, Russia and Romania.

It is highly desirable that, during the course, candidates will avail themselves of the opportunity of a 7 – 14 day period abroad which can be arranged through the department by participating in one of the exchanges or work experience trips, or independently.

Who does it suit?

Those who find language and linguistic work relatively easy should consider taking one, or more of these subjects. Study of more than one can be greatly beneficial to helping you come to understand the way languages work.

Any modern language fits well with any traditional arts subject, but obviously there is a great deal to be said in favour of doing a language to give breadth to a more scientific student’s portfolio of subjects.

Modern language graduates acquire skills that are highly prized by employers in a variety of professions and make them very desirable in today’s competitive job market. Old Wulfrunians who recently took an A level in a modern language are now employed in fields as diverse as interpreting, marketing, media and commerce.

Assessment

AS Unit 1:

  • Oral
  • 30% (60 marks)
  • 12-14 minutes

AS Unit 2:

  • Listening, Reading and Translation
  • 50% (100 marks)
  • 2 hours

AS Unit 3:

  • Critical Response in Writing
  • 20% (40 marks)
  • 1 hour 15 minutes

A Level Unit 1:

  • Speaking a) Presentation of Research and b) Discussion based on stimulus card
  • 30% of A Level
  • 21-23 minutes

A Level Unit 2:

  • Listening, Reading and Translation
  • 50% of A Level
  • 2 hours, 30 minutes

A Level Unit 3:

  • Critical and Analytical Response in Writing
  • 20% of A Level
  • 2 hours

Those who coped easily with GCSE could expect to find the work up to A level well within their capabilities. Italian is spoken by 55 million people in Italy and 62 million people globally. Italy has the 7th largest economy in the world and is a major political force in Europe.

Learning and applying grammar structures is an essential part of the course and it is not only useful to enable correct communication, but also to develop transferable skills (analysis, memorising, drawing of inferences) to complement other areas of the curriculum. In addition students will gain greater cultural understanding of Italy and the influence that Italian culture
has on the wider world.

The course follows a linear structure. A range of extra-curricular clubs and societies available to students across the school ensures confidence in languages is nurtured.

A Level Italian will be attractive to those who have enjoyed the challenge of Italian at GCSE and have found the linguistic aspect of work relatively easy. Studying more than one modern foreign language can also be greatly beneficial.

In addition to traditional international exchange partnerships with other schools, the department also arranges for Italian students to participate in an Italian Exchange.

Who does it suit?

Those who find language and linguistic work relatively easy should consider taking one, or more of these subjects. Study of more than one can be greatly beneficial to helping you come to understand the way languages work.

Any modern language fits well with any traditional arts subject, but obviously there is a great deal to be said in favour of doing a language to give breadth to a more scientific student’s portfolio of subjects.

Modern language graduates acquire skills that are highly prized by employers in a variety of professions and make them very desirable in today’s competitive job market. Old Wulfrunians who recently took an A level in a modern language are now employed in fields as diverse as interpreting, marketing, media and commerce.

Assessment

Unit 1:

  • Spoken Expression and Response
  • 15% of A Level
  • 8-10 minutes

Unit 2:

  • Understanding and Written Response
  • 35% of A Level
  • 2 hours, 30 minutes

Unit 3:

  • Understanding and Spoken Response
  • 17.5% of A Level
  • 11-13 minutes

Unit 4:

  • Research, Understanding and Written Response
  • 32.5% of A Level
  • 2 hours, 30 minutes

Course Downloads:

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